Politics

While votes are still being counted across the country, nearly 200 Republicans who have questioned the results of the 2020 election — or denied President Joe Biden’s victory outright — have won races in the midterms.

Republican Senate Candidate JD Vance speaks after winning, at an election night party in Columbus, Ohio, on Nov. 8, 2022. Maddie McGarvey/The New York Times

By Karen Yourish, Danielle Ivory and Weiyi Cai, New York Times Service

While votes are still being counted across the country, nearly 200 Republicans who have questioned the results of the 2020 election — or denied President Joe Biden’s victory outright — have won races in the midterms.

The New York Times recently examined statements made by Republican candidates in all 50 states for seats in the U.S. House and Senate and in the state races for governor, secretary of state and attorney general, and found that more than 370 had cast doubt on the outcome of the 2020 election, despite the lack of evidence of any widespread voter fraud.

As of 12: 30 a.m. Wednesday, at least 80 candidates who questioned the past election had lost their races. The election skeptics identified by the Times ranged from those who fully denied the 2020 results to those who stopped short of that falsehood, but rather, questioned the process or results, often by suggesting that there were irregularities, unresolved issues or a need for further examination.

More than 30 candidates who explicitly denied the results of the 2020 election have won so far. Most are incumbents, and all were favored to win.

In the Senate, Rep. Markwayne Mullin of Oklahoma will fill the Senate seat left by Jim Inhofe, a retiring Republican.

“I truly feel like the Democrat machine is stealing this election,” Mullin said after the 2020 election.

J.D. Vance, the Republican author of “Hillbilly Elegy,” defeated Rep. Tim Ryan to succeed Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio, who is retiring. Vance said in March 2022 that he thought the 2020 election was stolen from Donald Trump.

“I think the election was stolen from Trump…If we want to get to the bottom of what happened happened in 2020, we need to be able to speak about what actually happened and get to the bottom of it…There were problems in 2020, We can’t be afraid to talk about them.” – @JDVance1 pic.twitter.com/hxmY9mZQVd

— JD Vance for U.S. Senate Press (@JDVancePress) March 28, 2022

So far, more than a dozen Republicans who explicitly said the 2020 election was stolen or rigged have been elected to the House. They include newcomers like Anna Paulina Luna of Florida, who said she believed that Trump won the 2020 election. She will represent the 13th District in Florida in the next Congress.

Russell Fry, who ousted Rep. Tom Rice of South Carolina in the Republican primary, beat his Democratic opponent. “It is very clear that it was rigged,” Fry said about the 2020 election.

Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, Paul Gosar of Arizona and Matt Gaetz of Florida — all of whom have backed Trump’s claims — won reelection.

Gov. Kay Ivey of Alabama was also reelected to another term. In April 2022, she said “the fake news, big tech and blue-state liberals stole the election from President Trump.”

Biden won 7 million more votes and 74 more Electoral College votes than Trump did in 2020. Attempts by Trump and his allies to dispute the results were rejected by judges across the country.

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

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