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NOAA still predicts above-normal 2022 Atlantic hurricane season

Tropical Storm Colin was the last named storm of the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane season, which the NOAA still predicts will be above-normal. File Image by National Hurricane Center.

Aug. 4 (UPI) — The National Weather Service on Thursday said it still anticipates an above-normal 2022 Atlantic hurricane season.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center said there was still a 60% chance of an above-normal hurricane season, down slightly from a 65% chance predicted in its May outlook.

“We’re just getting into the peak months of August through October for hurricane development and we anticipate that more storms are on the way,” NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad said. “NOAA stands ready to deliver timely and accurate forecasts and warnings to help communities prepare in advance of approaching storms.”

The likelihood of normal activity rose to 30%, while the NOAA said chances of a below-normal season remained at 10%.

So far the season has produced three named storms — Alex, Bonnie and Colin — and no hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin.

An average hurricane season produces 14 named storms, seven of which become hurricanes, including three major hurricanes.

The NOAA still predicts the season will produce 14-20 named storms, with six to 10 hurricanes and three to five major hurricanes.

“Although it has been a relatively slow start to hurricane season, with no major storms developing in the Atlantic, this is not unusual and we therefore cannot afford to let our guard down,” FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell said.