Human Events Daily host Jack Posobiec recently warned of designer bioweapons designed by private companies.

“Two members of congressional intelligence committees have warned America that information gathered from DNA testing kits such as 23 and Me and others… could be used to develop bioweapons targetting specific groups of Americans or even individuals,” Posobiec read from an article featured on Zero Hedge.

Rep. Jason Crow, Dem. from Colorado who sits on the House intel committee warned that Americans are “too trusting of their DNA in the hands of private companies. There are now weapons under development that are designed to target specific people. Some of these, by the way, can be made to target actual individuals themselves,” Posobiec said.

Posobiec then provided a hypothetical situation where designer bioweapons could be used. “Think of the ability, you could inject yourself with this bioweapon, but if you’re not someone the bioweapon is targeting then you’re immune to it. But if you come into contact with that person and just breathe around them, the one that it’s targeted to, then it affects them and it kills them dead,” he said.

“This was actually a theory. Do you remember when Putin was holding those meetings in Russia, and he had that crazy long table, then he put Macron there and he put Schulz there? Remember that table? And also remember when Macron said, ‘I refuse to be tested for Covid’ when he went to Moscow. Why? Because he said he didn’t want the Russians to have his DNA.”

In February of this year, French President Emmanuel Macron refused to take a Russian Covid test citing DNA security concerns. Due to this, Macron was kept at a far distance from Putin.

Reuters reported that two sources who have knowledge of the French president’s health protocol that Macron had been “given a choice: either accept a PCR test done by the Russian authorities and be allowed to get close to Putin, or refuse and have to abide by more stringent social distancing.”

“We knew very well that meant no handshake and that long table. But we could not accept that they get their hands on the president’s DNA,” one of the sources told Reuters.

“So we just kind of blew past that,” said Posobiec. “Take those two data points, now add on this. The idea of personalized bioweapons. Is this something that our world leaders are actually scared of? Or actually, view as a serious threat to them? Potentially, they could inject themselves with a personalized bioweapon and then give it to somebody they want to give it to. I don’t know, but I do know that’s something that they’re obviously talking about, they’re talking about it at the Aspen security conference itself.”

“This is crazy. This is like something out of Resident Evil. You know this is something that’s going to be used. Absolutely going to go out of control. Private companies making designer bioweapons, what could possibly go wrong?!” Posobiec concluded.

In 2019, the The New York Times reported that Pentagon leadership said in an internal memo that military personnel should not to take mail-in DNA tests, “warning that they create security risks, are unreliable and could negatively affect service members’ careers.”

The letter, originally reported by Yahoo News, does not name any one DNA testing company specifically, “but counsels broadly against buying ancestry and health tests promoted with military discounts and other military incentives,” reported the NYT.

Cmdr. Sean Robertson, a Pentagon spokesman, confirmed that the memo had been sent. “We want to ensure all service members are aware of the risks of Direct to Consumer (DTC) genetic testing,” he told NYT in an email.

Ancestry.com, one of the more popular genetic testing sites, was acquired by Blackstone Group Inc for $4.7 billion in 2020.

“We believe Ancestry has significant runway for further growth as people of all ages and backgrounds become increasingly interested in learning more about their family histories and themselves,” David Kestnbaum, a Blackstone senior managing director, said in a statement to Reuters.